Archive for the ‘Film Review’ Category

Photography Documentaries I’ve Liked

Monday, February 20th, 2017

Photography Documentaries I’ve Liked

By David Cobb

 

It’s been a long time since the days of the boring and staid documentary. We’re now in the “Golden Age” of this genre, and there have been a number of good photography documentaries released over the past few years. I find that sometimes it’s difficult to make a decision on a film when I love the images, but the quality of the documentary is not great. (Maybe there are poor production values, or the film needed an editor, or it’s just not that interesting. When that happens, I prefer to look at a book of the photographer’s images.)

All the films on this list are easily accessible for viewing, and for the purposes of this list I haven’t included any television series. What follows are a few photography documentaries that I’ve liked from the many I’ve watched.

  1. The Salt of the Earth – (2014, Director Wim Wenders) This film relives the career of Sebastiao Salgado and covers his major body of work and exhibitions. From the opening scene of images at the gold mines of Serra Pelada to his work on his most recent project Genesis, the film leaves no doubt that Salgado is one of the greatest photographers ever.
  2. What Remains: The Life and Work of Sally Mann – (2005, Director Steven Cantor) An exploration into the creative mind of an artist. Sally Mann discusses her work through her successes, failures, her influences, and disappointments. There is something for every photographer to relate to in this film.
  3. Finding Vivian Maier – (2013, Directors John Maloof, Charlie Siskel) Possibly the most famous of all films on this list, Finding Vivian Maier is a movie about a woman who blended in and surreptitiously photographed non-stop for years with no one really knowing she was amassing a large catalogue of images. After her death her work was recently discovered, and the documentary pieces together her life from clues, photographs, and conversations with (now adult) children she looked after while fulfilling her job as a nanny. Her life is a bit of a mystery, but her outstanding photographic work shines a light into her spirit.
  4. Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry – (2012, Director Alison Klayman) Ai Weiwei is a multi-media artist and dissident with homes in the U.S. and China. He’s known in photography for his “giving the finger” images and also his selfies. He might be described as Warhol, Picasso, Calder, and Banksy, rolled into one. This isn’t truly a photography documentary, but it’s fascinating and thought-provoking.
  5. Black White + Gray: A Portrait of Sam Wagstaff and Robert Mapplethorpe – (2007, Director James Crump) A thoughtful film which brings to life the professional and personal relationship between Robert Mapplethorpe and his benefactor Sam Wagstaff.
  6. Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters – (2012, Director Ben Shapiro) The incredible production value, difficulty, and creativity of Gregory Crewdson’s photographs is on display in this mesmerizing documentary. The filming follows him during his work on his Beneath the Roses concept.
  7. Meru – (2015, Jimmy Chin, Chai Vasarhelyi) Ok, it’s not really a photography documentary, but photographer and videographer Jimmy Chin does a spectacular job of filming this first ascent. Teamed with Conrad Anker and Renan Ozturk, the climb of the imposing shark fin of India’s Mount Meru gave me the willies just watching. There is a section of this film which showcases some of the climbing photography techniques that Jimmy Chin uses when on assignment.
  8. War Photographer – (2001, Director Christian Frei) A documentary of photojournalist James Nachtwey who lets his images do the talking. He’s won numerous awards and the highest honors in his profession, and this documentary captures him on assignment in Kosovo, Indonesia, Africa, and the West Bank. The film opens with an adage from Robert Capa, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough,” and Nachtwey lives by these words. His photographic records of war, famine, and poverty are devastating, and his philosophy on why he’s a war photographer is fascinating. 
  9. Bill Cunningham New York – (2010, Director Richard Press) A delightful film which follows photographer Bill Cunningham snapping fashion images on the streets of New York. Cunningham carries this documentary with his outlook on life, simple lifestyle, fashion eye, dedication, and his infectious exuberance. If you’re ever down in the dumps or want to get out of a photography rut, this film is a dandy pick-me-up.
  10. Annie Leibovitz: Life Through a Lens – (2008, Director Barbara Leibovitz) This study in the life and career of Annie Leibovitz from her early days at the Rolling Stone to her work for Vanity Fair, Vogue, and her more personal work shows that even someone at the top of the photography world can still make mistakes and grow from them. Her work is astounding and her creative passion is an inspiration. The film is less in-depth than I would have liked, as some major portions of her life are discussed only on the surface.
  11. Inside Out: The People’s Art Project – (2013, Alastair Siddons) Street photographer JR takes his TED Talks Prize and gives it back to the people to create their own art. His world photography project helps humanize the disenfranchised from Pakistan to South Dakota as they produce giant portraits to post on the streets. They can no longer be ignored and must be seen, as they create their own power through imagery. The film is truly an inspiration to witness the influence of photography changing the common man on the street.

If there are other films you think I might be leaving off this list, let me know. Fellow Photo Cascadia members Adrian Klein and Erin Babnik shared films they liked such as Salt and The Quest for Inspiration. I haven’t seen them yet, but I’m on the lookout for these two. I hope you enjoy the films I’ve listed; many are available on Netflix so they’re easy to find and most have shorter run times. Now curl up with a bowl of popcorn and learn from the masters.

Movies That Inspire and Excite

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Chances are you would rather be out exploring and enjoying outdoors whether curb side view, hiking miles into the woods, paddling majestic waterways or the myriad of other options instead of reading a blog post. I can relate, seeing amazing places in photos and videos is rarely enough.

Not long ago I was having lunch with someone that said something I could not relate to at all. He said seeing amazing places in videos and photos is good enough for him and he doesn’t need to go see them himself (obviously he is not a photographer or outdoor enthusiast). For me it’s the exact opposite. When I read, see or hear about locations that offer great adventures or fantastic photo opportunities I want to go. It whets my appetite for more. I may never get to a particular location I am viewing photos of or dreaming about yet it certainly fuels the fire to simply get out. Being an armchair adventurer is not the goal. Getting out is and that is exactly what happens!

Baraka

One way I get inspired is watching flicks that make me think about places I have been, where I want to go, how I take my photos. Below is a short list of movies that makes me excited about getting out for the next outing or capturing the next spectacular photo.

One Man’s Wilderness
Few of us will ever attempt (or even desire to attempt) what Richard (Dick) Proenneke does for many years of his life. After spending decades working in the rat race around age 50 he decides to leave it all behind for year-around living of solitude in the Alaskan Wilderness. He creates his cabin, tools and more documenting his journey in writing along with some video and photo work.
I first heard about the story when someone gave me the book as a gift and since then I have also received or purchased multiple documentaries on his story. I will likely never make such an extreme change in lifestyle yet it’s a great reminder to me how important alone time is outdoors for photography, for rejuvenation, for simply reflecting on life and escaping the hustle and bustle daily life brings for many of us.

http://www.dickproenneke.com/

SALT
If you are picturing Angelina Jolie as a Russian spy right now chances are you are on the wrong blog. During the summer of 2010 I was getting ready to head for bed one evening when I figured I would watch a few minutes of TV before calling it a night. There are not many shows I watch and considering our TV gets less than 20 stations (mostly CSPAN and community access) you can tell our family is not big tube watchers. That said a couple stations I do enjoy from our wide assortment includes OPB and Discovery. That night I clicked on OPB and was immediately engulfed with what was on…which I found out afterward was the short film SALT. I subsequently took the time to watch the full video less than a week later.
Murray Fredericks as a landscape photographer documents his numerous solo adventures on Lake Eyre in Australia. Besides stunning video and photos he talks about what he is thinking while spending weeks alone on this vast open lake including SAT calls with his family. I place this in the must-view-category for any landscape or adventure photographer.

http://www.saltdoco.com/index.htm

Baraka and Samsara
Anyone that is serious into time lapse photography knows of the movies Baraka and it’s recent sequel Samsara. When I first met my wife over a decade ago she mentioned a movie Baraka playing at our local independent theatre that I would likely enjoy. Entering the theatre filled with mostly empty red velvet seats I had low hopes. Walking out I was in awe. 96 minutes of amazing footage with no words other than a few tribal chants.
Since then I have purchased Baraka and earlier this year my wife bought me the sequel which I have also watched and enjoyed just as much.  If you have not seen either of these you are missing out. They are worth your time.

http://barakasamsara.com/baraka/about

The Other Side of the Ice
There are two kinds of people, those that gravitate to the ocean and those that gravitate to land. I am naturally drawn to spending my time on land with a little water sprinkled in for good measure. I have full respect for those that can spend many weeks and months on a ship and little time ashore.
In The Other Side of the Ice a family successfully navigates the infamous Northwest Passage over a five month journey. It does not happen without amazing views, emotional struggles and close calls. I will say this is the only title in this post that I have not seen the whole movie. I read the book which I feel was very good yet all the reviews and trailers for the movie don’t excite me as much as the book. If you are not a book reader then the movie is an option.

The Other Side of the Ice

Happy People
There are very few of us left on planet Earth choosing to live without most of what the modern world offers… smartphones, high tech cars, piped heat/water, online ordering, the list goes on. This documentary shows the life of trappers and their families living in Bakhtia, the heart of Siberian Taiga. It’s a reminder that we don’t always need all the fancy gadgets of the modern world to survive and be happy.  When I leave the house and forget my iPhone, and I wonder how I will do a few hours without it I need to remember and think of folks in this film. Although not the life for me to live day-in-day-out, they obviously do quite well with very little. What can you do without?

180 South
At home sick one day roaming Netflix streaming I came across this movie. I remembered hearing about it yet hadn’t taken the time to watch it until this point. Amazing documentary, plain and simple. If you are in search of adventure, good stories and amazing visual feasts look no further. It’s hard to watch and not want to back your bags the next day for exotic lands. When thinking of travel and adventure documentaries, 180 South is first to come to mind.

I leave you with a quote from another movie about adventure, Into the Wild. I love the book and movie yet it’s more main stream which is why I left it out of this post.

“The very basic core of a man’s living spirit is his passion for adventure.”
– Christopher McCandless

What movies get you excited about getting outdoors for photography or fun?

Life in Focus Mini Series

Saturday, December 14th, 2013

By Adrian Klein

Last winter f-stopgear’s videographer (Cam) came out to the Northwest for a couple days of adventure to follow me around in my element as part of the company’s Life in Focus mini-series. They picked a group of their staff pro’s to partake in the project. I feel fortunate to have been included.

Cam did a top-notch job on the video and post production work. The colors and mood really show what it’s like to be hiking around the damp cool forests of the Northwest in winter. Below are some links to check out the video as well as text interview with f-stopgear.

Happy viewing and reading…

Full text interview on Phoblographer.

Here are some images from the video shoot. We were fortunate to have some pretty amazing conditions.

Valley Glow

Valley Glow near Mount Hood National Forest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Flames of Fall

Final Flames of Fall in the Columbia River Gorge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fog Shrouded

Fog Shrouded Forest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stormy Blues

Stormy Blues in the Columbia River Gorge on a moody sunset

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View more of my work on www.adrianklein.com

The Bang Bang Club (Film review) by David Cobb

Sunday, September 8th, 2013

“The Bang Bang Club”

Film review by David Cobb

 

It’s not often that films are made about photographers, and when they are they’re usually documentaries. There are a few exceptions: In the early 2000s “City of God” dealt with the issue of photography in a peripheral manner, and so did the films “Proof” and “High Art” in the 1990s. Of course the 60’s classic “Blow Up” coupled photography with a possible crime and the exploration of what a photographer really captured on film.

With the 2011 release of the “Bang Bang Club” (based on the book of the same name by Marinovich and Silva), photography is in the forefront of a film that follows the lives of four photographers during the crisis of apartheid in South Africa.  Two of the photographers Kevin Carter and Greg Marinovich, each won the Pulitzer Prize for their photography. (Carter, who took the mind-searing image of the vulture waiting for the child to die in the Sudan, committed suicide 14 months after his award.) Ken Oosterbroek was awarded the Ilford Press Photographer of the Year in ’89 and ’94 and was killed in action during 1994. Co-author Joao Silva was awarded the World Press Photo and lost his legs to a land mine in 2010 while photographing in Afghanistan.

The film (directed by Steven Silver) recounts the brutal violence and tumult of apartheid in the early 90s. Newbie Marinovich (Ryan Phillippe) joins a group of photographers working for The Star newspaper and is offered a freelance job after he takes some stunning images of Zulu warriors from a Soweto township. The group is later named the “Bang Bang Club” after venturing time and again into war-torn areas of South Africa. The team become friends and develop a strong bond, making them all better photographers and at the same time creating a certain level of mystique.

Their lives as photojournalists stay in the gray area and the film raises questions about the moral dilemmas of photo journalism. Are the photographers paparazzi, hyenas, heroes, or just doing their job? It also asks the question of when and if a photojournalist should help those in harm’s way. I started wondering to myself just how far I would go for a photo if I was in their shoes. As this group of photographers snaps the mayhem and murder of the daily life around them, they also struggle with the evil they witness in their lives. In one scene, Marinovich’s girlfriend and editor has to hold a lamp for illumination while he photographs a dead child, depicting just how desensitized to death he has become. The movie also captures the price paid by those they love and the people who surround their unsettled lives. A personal toll is taken on the photographers as they live with the danger of their jobs.

The “Bang Bang Club” is a powerful look at historical events and of the people who covered them. It’s well acted throughout and lead Phillippe is solid as usual. If you’re interested in photography and what it takes shoot under extreme duress, this film will be of interest to you. A trailer follows below.