Posts Tagged ‘winter’

20 Quick Tips For Photographing Abraham Lake In The Winter

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Images from Preachers Point on Abraham Lake near the town of Nordegg in the Kootney Plains

Abraham Lake is an artificial lake found in the Canadian Rockies. It can be reached by taking the David Thompson Highway off the Icefields Parkway and driving North for around 20 minutes. On the right, you will see a pullout parking lot called Preachers Point. This pullout is a great place to access the lake. From here, you can easily walk down to the lake. Once on the lake, there are many opportunities to photograph within a short distance of your car.

Over the past few years, I have had the chance to visit Abraham Lake in different seasons. By far my favorite season is winter because of the unique conditions that occur due to the colder temperatures. It can reach as low as -30 in the Abraham Lake area. These frigid temperatures create conditions to develop on the lake that is one of the most unusual natural phenomena of the world. The decomposing plants on the lake bed release methane gas which freezes as it gets closer to the much colder surface causing “Frozen Bubbles.” As the temperature drops the bubbles start to stack below each other forming a pretty incredible and unique sight.

Photographers from all over the world come to Abraham Lake to capture this unique occurrence. I’ve written this article to list some of my most essential tips for successful images when photographing Abraham Lake.

abraham-lake-white-bubbles_720

  1. Abraham Lake is often very windy and cold. Due to its geographic location, the wind channels through the valley. Winter temperatures can be extremely frigid with the windchill. Prepare to bring more clothes than normal to stay warm. Bring a balaclava or facemask to keep your face warm. Bring fingerless gloves so you can operate your camera while keeping your gloves on. I combined fingerless gloves with a second layer of gloves that are known as touchscreen gloves. I have included a link below for what I believe to be the best on the market.
  1. Give yourself lots of time to find compositions that will interest your viewer. The first comment that most people say to me on a workshop is how overwhelming it can be when you first see the lake. Due to its size and vastness, there can be many choices to photograph, which may seem at first very daunting. I arrive several hours early to explore several different compositions. I research ahead of time some of the images that appeal to me. I then work up a theory and pre-visualize the story I would like to translate through my image.
  1. Bring several camera batteries with you as the colder temperatures shorten how long a battery will work. It is not unusual to go through two or three batteries in one hour when photographing during the winter on Abraham Lake. It is helpful when trying to conserve battery life to keep a couple of spare batteries in a jacket. Finding a way to storing the extra batteries continually in a warm place will go a long way to extending the battery life while photographing.
  1. Related to the previous tip, bring hand warmers and feet warmers. I can’t stress the importance of using some accessory to keep warm. It can make the difference between a pleasurable time and a challenging one. With the combination of a good warm winter boot and gloves, you are ready for any conditions on the lake.
  1. Bring a good heavy duty tripod. Having a good sturdy tripod will help immensely in keeping your tripod from slipping on the ice. Place the tripod low to the ground to avoid vibrations from the windy conditions. As mentioned before, winds can get very active on the lake. It does not take much to make your tripod shake. The wind and camera shake will cause your image to go soft and blurry.
  1. In windy conditions, raise the ISO of the camera to 800 or even 1600. The faster shutter speed will help prevent camera shake and blurry images.
  1. Don’t be afraid to try several different types of compositions as you continue to look for ways to piece together elements within a scene. I will often try to keep the camera low to the ground at roughly a 45° angle. As I continue to try different compositions throughout my scouting, I develop a story of how I want to approach the final image.
  1. Bring a very wide-angle lens with you to capture the bubbles and enhance the size of the textures that are nearest to the camera. When using a wide-angle lens on the lake and photographing very close to the bubbles within the ice, the wide angle lens will accentuate elements that are near the lens and make objects in the distance appear smaller. The placement of the lens and camera near to the ground gives the image the appearance of three-dimensional depth throughout the scene.
  1. Have a microfiber lens cloth close at hand to keep the lens as clean as possible. Watch for any condensation that might build up on the front of the lens in colder conditions. Also, avoid changing lenses on the lake when winter conditions are present.
  1. It’s a good idea to bring a medium telephoto to photograph some of the distant mountain peaks in closer detail. The look of the longer lens will offer a different look than the wide-angle images that are often seen at Abraham Lake. I like to try different lenses at Abraham Lake to give the viewer several different looks. Also, don’t be afraid to bring a macro lens to photograph the unique textures of the bubbles found just underneath the ice.
  1. When exposing for the scene, I will often exposure bracket my images depending on the tonal range. In extreme conditions, I have bracketed my images all the way from three images to nine images for one scene. The highlights of the ice can be very bright as well as the snowcapped peaks. It is essential to capture several exposures of negative value to avoid blowing out the highlights. I will then use post processing methods to combine these images into one image with all tonal values combined.
  1. It is critical in winter to bring an apparatus that can be placed on the bottom of the boot. It can be any accessory such as spikes, crampons, or any other device that provides traction on the ice. Abraham Lake is very slippery and can cause serious damage if you try to maneuver without some sort of traction on your boot. I like to use spikes that I wrap around the bottom of my snow boot which allows me to walk comfortably and safely on the ice.
  1. Dress in layers, as you will find yourself quickly heating up while actively walking around looking for compositions but losing heat quickly once stationary in one spot. I use several layers of winter clothing that can easily be taken on or off depending on my activity at the time. For example, while actively searching for compositions I will expend energy and thus create sweat while walking around on the ice. Once I find something regarding composition I’m happy with, I might be stationary for time periods of several minutes or more. Having access to changing or removing clothing is critical to keeping at a comfortable temperature while photographing on the lake.
  1. Don’t be afraid to lie on the ice and try creative framing and pairing of elements. I often will find myself trying to explore new possibilities when composing images on Abraham Lake. Don’t hesitate to try new things, and photograph the lake in new creative ways. For example, I tried placing my camera on remote focusing at infinity and putting it on a timer or a remote to capture an image from inside the ice shelves to create the look of ice caves.
  1. Make sure to photograph during the twilight hours before sunrise and after sunset to expand the variety of images you capture. Shooting during the twilight hours will give many different moods to the overall look of the lake.
  1. Make sure on your LCD monitor to frequently check the detail of each image. I will often go in at 100% on the back of the camera to check that all elements are sharp and focused. Because of the wind, movement of the tripod can occur in small increments but enough to cause the image to move. Without going in all the way on the back of your camera LCD, it is hard to see whether it is sharp all the way through the image
  1. Use caution when exploring on the lake. The lake can be several layers thick with ice, use common sense if areas that appear to look less safe. For example, during warmer periods, melting and instability can occur.
  1. Bring snacks and meals with you in your bag. There is nothing very close to the lake regarding food. You will find your body, needs the extra carbs from the colder conditions. Having a snack in your bag that is easy to grab will help keep your body energized and prevent you from wasting time going back to your vehicle.
  1. Give yourself several days including sunrises and sunsets to maximize your opportunity of capturing several different images. Capture the lake in as many different settings as possible. One option is to rent a camper or RV so that you can be situated next to the lake. The other alternative is to look into accommodation near the lake.
  1. Try to remember to have fun and take the time to enjoy the experience.

 

Eastern Influence by David M. Cobb

Monday, May 11th, 2015

Eastern Influence

By David M. Cobb

  Moods of the Gorge

Over the years I’ve spent a great deal of time visiting art museums, searching out the European masters, the cubists, the impressionists, the Hudson River School, and others. But it wasn’t until I saw Edward Weston’s Pepper #30 that photography entered into the equation. Western art influenced my sense of design and light, and my schooling reinforced those Western perspectives of art.

Delicate

Later in life other influences came into play, specifically art from Asia. A number of years ago a photographer suggested I read Empty and Full: The Language of Chinese Painting by Francois Cheng. That was the beginning of change for me. I now find myself seeking out Chinese reliefs and Japanese block prints when I roam art museums; their influence helps me incorporate Eastern perspectives into my work. My photography changes but that change can seem frustratingly slow, and sometimes I end up with more failures than successes.  With my changing perceptions, the scenes that are more difficult to come by are the asymmetrical compositions—that sense of unbalance that “feels” odd to me. But I’m learning to adapt and must let all that go. There’s now more of a visual emphasis on negative space in many of my compositions, and with that comes an economy of line.

Garden Trees

However, it is a struggle. My old eye fights with the new, and the old ways usually win. Some scenes play to my new eye easier than others; for instance a landscape with fog or a mountain shrouded in mist is easier to compose and capture in a new way. With a complex scene in a forest or a desert landscape, I tend to fall back on my western influences. Thoreau stated “simplify, simplify, simplify” and that is what I strive to do more often than not. My compositions succeed when I’m more open to change in my photography and when I’m compositionally deliberate as I reflect on my Eastern influence.  With time, my hope is to make this an intuitive thought process.

Forest Smoke

Examples of current photographers who excel at capturing this Eastern aesthetic in their landscape photography are John Einarsen, Leping Zha, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Hiroshi Watanabe, and John Sexton. A photographer like John Paul Caponigro uses negative space extremely well, especially in his more surreal images. Symmetry and not asymmetry plays a larger part in his photography. His photos have a spiritual and even mystical sense to them (especially his celestial images), which connects well with the Eastern ideal and the land he photographs.

Fire & Ice

My struggle and creative journey will continue, but that’s part of the challenge and fun that comes from growth.

The Stone Garden

Photographing the Klamath Basin by David Cobb

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Photographing the Klamath Basin

By David Cobb

 

One of the West’s great photographic treats is visiting the Klamath Basin on the Oregon and California border during the fall or spring bird migration. I’m not a birder, but the site of so much wildlife surrounded by a beautiful stark landscape always makes me excited to take photographs.  My recent spring trip with Sean Bagshaw was brief, but the birds were ample, the light fantastic, and we were able to break in his new camper on its maiden voyage.

 

Sean browses information.

Sean Bagshaw at an information booth.

I’ve photographed here during the fall and spring migrations, and I find the success rate as a photographer better in the spring than the fall due to fall hunting. When the hunters are out the birds are more wary and skittish, and who can blame them? I also find the water reflections more abundant and interesting during the spring migration, which helps with landscape photo opportunities. Fall light offers nice rust tones in the trees and fields for colorful background, but I still prefer photographing here during spring.

During my fall visit a few years ago, I paid for a permit to the wildlife refuge which allowed me to reserve time in different photo blinds. There is a raptor blind, a cramped songbird blind, a water fowl blind, and a wading-bird blind. Some are better at sunset or sunrise, and some are better in spring than fall, so choose your blind accordingly. (For example, the wading-bird blind is better in the spring, since the area can dry out by fall and then wading birds are elsewhere.) If you schedule a blind for the morning expect to be there before sunrise to escape the watchful eyes of your subjects. You may also apply for an afternoon session, but there are limits on how long you can stay in any one blind.

Photographed from the raptor bird blind.

Prairie Falcon

For this spring season visit, Sean and I drove the back roads of the refuge looking for flocks. We traded information with other photographers and locals, and then relocated as necessary to find the next flock. Usually a drive along Stateline Road is a good starting strategy. Local etiquette asks that you keep your distance from the birds, so bring a lens with enough power that you’re not chasing the birds away. And remember to be respectful of the other people who are there to observe.

Flock of Snow Geese

Flock of Snow Geese

Snow Geese Reflection

Snow Geese Reflection

During sunset we found some ponds which offered opportunity for reflected light, and for morning we chose to photograph a flooded field with Mount Shasta standing sentinel in the distance. At the southern end of Tule Lake, you’ll find Captain Jack’s Stronghold where the Modocs defended themselves for a year against soldiers and settlers until surrendering in 1873.

Mount Shasta and Klamath Basin

Mount Shasta stands sentinel over the Klamath Basin.

Reflective pond at sunset.

Sunset over the Klamath Basin

I haven’t been here for the winter raptor photo opportunities, but I’ve heard it’s a regular smorgasbord of birds. If you’re interested in photographing raptors feasting on waterfowl, the best time to arrive is February. The “Winter Wings” festival is usually held mid-February, so around this time you’ll be there near peak.

If you’re planning a trip here, there are neighboring camping opportunities and the nearby town of Klamath Falls, Oregon offers ample lodging.  Also note that many of the parking areas require permits, which can be picked up from most of the surrounding markets.

Photographing Yellowstone National Park in the Winter by Kevin McNeal

Sunday, February 24th, 2013

 

Grand Prismatic Sunset

Grand Prismatic Sunset

 

This past week I had the opportunity to visit Yellowstone National Park in the winter. I have wanted to photograph this special place in winter conditions but never had the chance. Well my wishes came true this week and I was given the opportunity to co-lead a Yellowstone Winter workshop with three other great instructors. Being that is was my first time in the park I was a novice and was prepared to make some mistakes. I believe each park has its own special qualities that capture the essence of it. Needless to say, I learned so much from this past workshop. Not only from the other instructors but the students as well. So if I went back I would do a few things different that will help other photographers visiting Yellowstone in the winter. The following are some helpful hints if you decide to photograph this majestic place in the winter.

 

Eye In The Storm

Eye In The Storm

Firstly, bring all your lenses from widest to telephoto. You will need a lens capable of at least 300mm. I only brought a 70- 200mm L and I found out quick that was not nearly enough. I was constantly finding scenes that were stunning but did not have the lens to capture it. If you have a 100-400L lens that should appropriate for most scenes in the park. Whether you are shooting wildlife or landscapes I found that I was restricted to where I could shoot from because of the snow. In past situations I would move closer to the subject but when you are photographing with others this is not something that can be afforded to you. When getting around in Yellowstone during winter conditions park access is restricted to snowmobiles and snow cats. During our time in the workshop the group was divided into two snow cats. To book snow cats you can do that in West Yellowstone where we made it our home base. In West Yellowstone you can find adequate accommodations and food as well.

                                 Secondly, I would have held my camera in my hand while in the snow cat. Many chances to capture wildlife happened in a split second and by the time you reach for your camera it was too late. You have to be open to the idea of hand holding your camera and shooting through the snow cat windows (they keep the windows very clean) as this is your only opportunity in many cases. I have always been a tripod kind of person, so I had to adjust to new circumstances. This included shutter speeds and aperture which are completely different if you are hand holding. The other problem is the snow cat does not stop every time you see something you would like to shoot. The snow cat only makes stops where the majority of the photographers in the vehicle would like to stop. The emphasis was primarily on wildlife in the park.

 

Last Light Geysers

Last Light Geysers

Thirdly, I did not bring a wide enough range of clothing with me on the trip. The mornings were very cold, well below zero but the afternoons really warmed up. I found I brought enough cold apparel but not enough clothes for warmer weather, which was also breathable. Especially when the snow cat would stop for long periods of time. You would get cold exiting the snow cat but as soon as you moved around you would sweat immediately. I needed some clothes that adapted to all the particular situations. For example, clothes that were not just breathable but also have zippers down the side making it easier for quick access depending on the situation. Also make sure to bring gloves that can provide access to your camera controls, as you are not going to be taking your gloves off. Many students did not have this option and unfortunately ended up back in the snow cat due to the cold conditions.

                              Lastly, the most important thing I would do different is time my visit to coincide with better photography weather. As I was involved in co-leading a workshop I did not have this option. Timing the weather conditions is very hard to do in this park but can be done. If you can see that the weather calls for favorable conditions in the park a few days ahead make the trip, as it will be definitely be worth it. If possible fly in to either Idaho Falls airport or Jackson Hole airport; both airports are within a few hours of the park. The best place to make accommodations is West Yellowstone. Prices are reasonable for accommodations and transportation. Reservations can be made here for transportation into the park. When I visited this past week the conditions in terms of snow were not ideal. If I traveled by myself I would have waited it out in West Yellowstone before making the trip inside the park. There is a high probability of snow most days in the winter so waiting it out should not take too many days.

 

The Variety Of Colors In Yellowstone

The Variety Of Colors In Yellowstone

 

In conclusion, each photographer will have a set of ideals that are important to him or her when photographing in Yellowstone during winter season. From my experience, these simple tips can go a long way to improving your success in the park.

 

Introduction To Winter Photography – By Kevin McNeal

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

 

Winter is a special time for photographers who enjoy the challenges and the rewards that come with winter photography. Dedication comes to mind, when we think of photographers that enjoy adventures in subzero temperatures, to capture images that other photographers would not be willing to even consider.

A trip to the park in summer means hot weather, overcrowding, and congestion. On the other hand, winter is the perfect time to try shooting some unique perspectives of your favorite places. The solitude and peacefulness of a winter scene takes on a new persona and allows the photographer to see it in a whole new light. What really makes winter special for the photographer is the chance to be out in nature on a more intimate level. This time alone in nature makes one really think about what it is they are to trying to capture, and how they are going to relate this to their audience. Winter photography can be very rewarding if one prepares themselves for the challenges of colder temperature. There are a few simple tips that will make your winter adventures more enjoyable.

The following three concepts are equally important to the enjoyment and longevity of winter photography: 1) clothing; 2) camera equipment, and 3) the picture-making process.

Common among these elements is the notion of preparation for all winter conditions you may encounter. An absence of planning in winter can deter any photographer from further experiencing the true beauty of winter.

 

 

When it comes to shooting in the winter, weather can be unpredictable. The best way to prepare for weather is to expect anything in the winter. Therefore, dressing appropriate for the situation is fundamental for winter photography. When it comes to dressing, it is necessary to plan ahead for situations of changing weather. Preparing the body for winter includes wearing something light and loose, so the body can regulate the escape of body heat.

Shooting in colder temperatures, the body temperature changes dramatically between hot and cold depending on the activity. As photographers are well aware of, photography can vary in terms of activity levels. Anticipating this level of activity means wearing clothing that can be easily opened with zippers in specific areas of the body for fresh ventilation and not wearing multiple layers that cause the body to overheat. For a photographer who already carries heavy camera equipment, dressing in layers is not ideal. The kind of clothing recommended is some form of loose fitting, breathable jacket that has zippers, allowing the photographer to quickly open and close depending on the level of activity. Also, it is important to wear clothes that leave no area of the body exposed to the colder temperatures. Always wear a warm hat to avoid excessive heat loss through the head. Research shows that seventy percent of one’s body heat can be lost by not wearing a hat in colder climates. In addition to a warm hat, wear pants that are fully waterproof, yet comfortable so that different types of shooting can occur. For example, photographers sometimes like to kneel in the snow to get closer to the subject. The ability for a photographer to move around comfortably and stay dry is critical. In terms of footgear, boots need to be waterproof, insulated, and high enough around the ankles to prevent leakage of snow. Gators, which are water resistant equipment that goes around footgear from the ankle to the knee, and keeps the snow from getting inside the boots are Recommended.

 

 The one piece of equipment that most photographers wear incorrectly is gloves. Although most photographers wear some form of warm lining or gloves, most will wear gloves that do not have fingertips. They believe that fingerless gloves can help the photographer manipulate easier the camera controls. The truth is, most winter conditions are cold enough that exposed fingertips will hinder any finer control movements of the camera, thus being unable to operate the camera properly. The better option is to wear gloves that have removable fingertips that are held by strings from the body of the glove to the fingertips. Depending on the activity the fingertips can be easily removed or put back on. When it comes to enjoying your time in winter, the right type of clothing can make all the difference between a good and bad day. What about the ‘Tech Gloves’ that have a special end on the first and index fingers for working camera controls? I bought a pair at REI yesterday.

The most neglected area of winter shooting is winterizing camera equipment. What do you mean ‘winterizing camera equipment’? As I understand it, the modern digital cameras do not need to be winterized like the old film cameras. There are a few important considerations to be aware of when preparing camera equipment for winter. Keeping batteries warm should be separate from any winterizing. Do you find that batteries recover when warmed up? Depending on how cold the temperature is, one common problem prevalent among photographers is short-term camera battery life. Results vary on temperature and camera model, but it is safe to assume that batteries might only last a few minutes in cold weather. Do you ever put one of those hand warmers on the camera to keep battery area warm? Therefore, always carry extra batteries in the winter. Carry the extra set in a warm area like a pocket close to the body. This keeps the spare batteries warm and ready to switch out when the current batteries lose their power. Throughout the day continue to switch out the cold batteries with the warm ones for longer shooting.

Another common problem with camera equipment in winter is the condensation that occurs on a camera from changes in environments. Very cold air has very little water vapor, it is dry. When a camera comes from a cold outside environment to a warmer and more humid environment area like a heated vehicle, water vapor can condense on the outside and inside of the camera. Water inside the camera can cause the electrical components to malfunction and corrode. To avoid this, bring a large Ziploc or large trash bag to keep the camera inside until the temperature inside the bag is roughly the same as room temperature.

 

 

It is imperative to realize that mistakes are common when you are new to winter photography and every individual will have different things that work for them. Success comes with perseverance, and learning from mistakes is the key to continued involvement in shooting. Try different things by experimenting with different types of adventures, varying length, weight load, and locations. Take some early trips near home and figure what works for your style. These starter trips also give the body a chance to acclimatize to the colder conditions and build tolerance over time. Once everything is ready to go with your clothing and equipment, the only thing is to reward the winter experience with some great images.

Photography in the winter is a lot different than any other time for a variety of reasons. The main obstacle in the picture making process is the challenge of exposure. When evaluating exposure, the camera meter cannot give an accurate reading for white subjects like snow or ice. This is because snow fools the camera meter in trying to average out the luminosity of the snow, and ends up turning the snow grey rather than white. To get around this exposure challenge you must open up one or two stops on the camera to retain the highlights. Proper exposure varies depending on the light available. It is recommended to bracket images whenever the camera’s meter cannot give an accurate reading. Bracketing in one-stop increments beginning at an even exposure bias (0) and extend the exposure bias by plus/minus two stops at either end. A common solution to this exposure challenge is to take an average reading with your camera’s spot meter of a subject such the base trunk of a tree.

 

 

The single most important element in improving winter photography is working with the light. In wintertime, the light quality is unique, as frequent changes in weather take place. These weather changes make the clouds susceptible to more movement, thus more opportunities to capture the transient light. Transient light can be described as changing light that occurs as clouds interact with the sun’s luminosity. This diffused light at sunrise or sunset can lead to dramatic lighting that is accentuated by the contrast of the white snow. As well, in winter, light at sunrise or sunset lasts longer allowing the opportunity for longer periods of shooting. To capitalize on this opportunity look for situations that allow for side lightning that pronounces a subject’s features. Side lighting not only enhances the contours and shapes of the subject but it gives the image depth. Depth to an image draws a viewer into an image and makes it more interesting.

To make the most of winter weather, track weather systems in your local area and be present when these weather changes occur. Snow is a natural reflector of light so incorporate subjects into your composition that will reflect color into the image. Subjects that can improve compositions in winter situations are icicles, ice rim, frosted subjects, and natural shapes outlined in the snow. Capturing light in winter can lead to very dramatic images that stand out. Impact is important in pleasing images, and balancing composition with stunning colors is the way to achieve this. Rewarding winter images are possible when you learn to read and understand the light. Preparation is essential and visualizing your subject beforehand and how it will react with the light is important. Once you learn how to control the light you can use the combination of winter elements to make available light work to your advantage.

 

 

In conclusion, preparation is the unifying concept that ties all these recommendations together. It’s the combination of successful planning that makes it even more pleasurable when everything comes together out in the field. Success follows those that prepare and envision what they are trying to capture. Winter is a great time to get out and try something new. Take time to enjoy what you are doing and make sure to come back with some great images.

 

Preparing For Winter Photography – By Kevin McNeal

Monday, March 14th, 2011

Shadow And Light - Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada

Excitement always comes over me when I hear snow will be coming my way. For me there is something magical about winter that is hard to describe in words and only can be summed up in an image. The single most challenge to winter photography has to be the preparation. Not having the right essentials can lead to life-threating situations. Learning these lessons can really go a long ways to having fun while out in the snow as well as your safety. The following article is a list of the top ten things I have learned to prepare for winter photography.

Repeating Valleys - Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada

Top Ten Things To Prepare For Winter Photography

1) Learn to read and understand snow reports. There are many reasons for this but the most important is to avoid avalanches while out in the backcountry. Avalanches are always imminent after a sizeable amount of snow falling on frozen snow. The frozen snow below acts as a buffer and escalates chances of avalanches.

2) Make sure to try all equipment beforehand to make sure it fits. Nothing is worse then when you are stuck in the snow and the equipment doesn’t fit or will not work. Lets admit sometimes we put on a lot of weight and we are not the same anymore. If you are like me and your weight yo-yo’s do yourself the favor of trying everything on the day before. This is especially true for the first outing of the season.

3) Be honest with yourself about your physical condition and what you are capable of. It’s easy to get carried away with the getting to a certain destination without planning on getting back. Exercise in the snow is a whole new ball game and what you might be capable of on dry land is a different story for snow. The fact is making your way through snow is not as easy as it looks; your body will use different muscles then it is use to and before you know it you are hurting in areas you did not know even existed.

Without A Sole In Sight - Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada

4) This is common sense and partly goes with the above point but make sure to stretch before and after for a period for ten to fifteen minutes to really warm up the muscles and avoid any cramps.

5) Bring a friend if you can and always tell me people where you are going to be and when they can expect you back. Travelling during the winter in the backcountry can be exciting but it also can be very dangerous. Many of us are impatient to get out there to photograph but it is worth it to wait for a buddy to come.

6) Research the areas you are going to see if there are any snowshoe routes laid down or where you might go in case of an emergency. Books that are great for us in the Pacific Northwest are snowshoe routes of Washington and Oregon that specifically lay out the best routes to go, when, and far they are. It also prepares you for what is ahead and what you can expect in terms of physical exercise. When starting out or a lack of knowledge about the backcountry the best plans are to stick to the routes or tracks that have already been laid out. This way if you notify someone of the area and route it makes emergency services reaching you a lot more possible.

7) Make sure to prepare camera equipment for winter. For some people this might seem foreign but the winter weather can really take a toll on your camera and cease the camera from working; I would sure hate to hike all the way in the snow to find out my camera was not working. So what can you do to prepare for this; bring a couple extra batteries, leave a set of batteries in your pocket that stay warm, bring a Ziploc bag to prevent condensation in the camera when taking it from hot to cold environments or vice versa. Another thing to be aware of is the tripod and protecting your hands from colder temperatures; these temperatures can cause your hand to stick to the tripod along the metal outer parts if not insulated. Lastly, bring snow baskets for your tripod to avoid your tripod sinking into the snow.

Gates of Frozen Ghosts - Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada

8) Allow more time that you think to plan for your route; especially if you are trying to make it somewhere for sunrise or sunset. Preparing to photograph in winter takes a lot more time then in other seasons so factor this in to your allotted time.

9) Dress in layers! When exercising in the snow all the clothing one wears can become awfully hot fast causing a lot of sweat that later turns to cold dampness when idle and photographing. It is important that you can shed layers easily and quickly when needed during the physical portion of winter photography. I also look for clothes that are dry-wick and light; I want to have these clothes easily accessible when taking them off and on.

10) Have fun with the outing and don’t get to dependent on getting to the destination but enjoy the journey!

Mystery Peaks- Garibaldi Provincial Park, BC, Canada